16 Aug Energy: GravityLight, An Electricity Generator for 1.2 Billion

Introduction to Deciwatt's GravityLight

The impact of gravity light can be 1.2 billion people, or about 20% of the world population.
The impact of gravity light can be 1.2 billion people (~20% of the world).
UK firm Deciwatt has set out to solve one of the world's pressing problems -- lack of access to electricity -- by a new device called the GravityLight. About 20% of the world population has no access to what's now considered a basic necessity. With a rising population, especially in developing countries, unfortunately, this percentage is expected to remain the same for the next 20 years. Without cost-effective alternatives, most people have to rely on kerosene lamp. A kerosene lamp is a bottle filled with a fuel and lighting with a wick at the top. Kerosene lamps have four major disadvantages:
  • Breathing kerosene fumes everyday is equivalent to smoking 40 cigarettes a day.
  • The cost of kerosene is high relative to the income of the poorest. Poor households often spend at least 10% of their income on this power source -- as much as $36 billion according to the World Bank.
  • Kerosene lamps are dangerous since the light comes from an open fire. In India alone, 1.5 million people have been burned by kerosene lamps.
  • The world suffers from carbon dioxide pollution caused by kerosene lamps which is estimated to be about 3%.
A company called Deciwatt proposed a solution via a prototype device called the GravityLight. Unlike other power sources, the device invented by UK industrial designers Jim Reeves and Martin Riddiford requires no battery, sunlight, or wind. Its energy source is based on fundamental physics -- gravity. Seconds is all that's needed to lift the 12 kg bag which powers the device. As the weight slowly falls, GravityLight can produce 20 minutes of light. Riddiford, now 60, a cofounder of London-based product design firm Therefore and now a cofounder of Deciwatt, got the idea six years ago after leaving a meeting with a charity interested in solar tech. “I just sort of had this vision of, well, why can’t you use human power and store it as potential energy rather than in a battery,” he says. Riddiford has a record for innovative devices including the Brinlock Abacus calculator which was the first calculator with number-shaped buttons. He stated that he regrets not having done charitable work overseas in his youth and hopes to make up for it with his light. In 2013, Deciwatt raised £265,000 on crowdfunding platform Indiegogo to fund the tooling, manufacture and distribution of its first 1,000 lights. More recently, in 2015, Deciwatt won the Shell Springboard program, which supports young entrepreneurs with innovative low-carbon ideas. It received £150,000 to help develop the product further and expand into new markets, beating 150 other applicants to take the prize. Deciwatt says the GravityLight can cost as low as $10 for the owner. The actual price varies across different markets. The price will reduce in the future as mass manufacturing and the increasing efficiency of LEDs drive the cost down. Even with current prices, the owner can see a return on investment after just three months.
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10 Jul Energy: Nautical Torque

Introduction Note: This post was written by one of two founders of Nautical Torque, Galon Maloney, with minor edits by Shen Ge. Shen Ge recently contacted Galon to acquire an overview of the company. Two and a half years ago, on November 1, 2012, Nautical Torque Technology, a designer and manufacturer of innovative mechanical equipment and processes to produce continuous renewable electricity, announced that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) issued the company its first U.S. patent. This patent is the first step towards bringing a new type of renewable to the market and help utility companies meet their renewable portfolio standards. [caption id="attachment_348" align="alignleft" width="462"]“Our next milestone is to raise seed capital to complete our first prototype and bring this essential renewable to the market”, states inventor and founder Cahill Maloney. “Our next milestone is to raise seed capital to
complete our first prototype and bring this
essential renewable to the market”, states
inventor and founder Cahill Maloney.[/caption]

Patent US 8,143,733 B2, relates to the capturing of the kinetic energy from the rise and fall of large particles of floating mass such as ships, barges, and tankers. Rather than use the horizontal force of water to turn a turbine or generator, Nautical Torque utilizes the lifting and lowering of water to capture the kinetic energy from the slow moving mass that rises and falls with the incoming and outgoing tide. The design utilizes equipment and facilities that can be securely located and protected on a dock rather than underwater or offshore, offering lower development and transmission costs than any other wave and tidal technologies on the market. Nautical Torque uses mass as the input source for simplicity and scaleability achievable within current mechanical technology.

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16 Jun Sustainability: Bye-You Bug

Introduction Note: This post was written by the founders of Yutumi. [caption id="attachment_320" align="alignleft" width="300"]Yutumi bye-you bug products. Yutumi bye-you bug products.[/caption] Sarah Plunkett and Ryan McDonner, owners of Yutumi (You-to-me) have launched a new bug spray that will change your idea of how you apply and think about traditional DEET Free repellents. Many bug sprays seen on the market utilize traditional essential oils such as citronella, lemongrass, geranium, etc. Not only do these essential oils smell like bug spray, they feel like bug spray too. These products tend to leave your skin oily and greasy. BYE-YOU BUG® was formulated to be the exact opposite of what you normally buy and use. It is non-greasy due to the main ingredients being pure vanilla extract (which is alcohol based) as well as soybean oil, citric acid (lemon juice), vegetable glycerin, and one essential oil that forms each unique scent. Therefore, you feel dry after spraying and rubbing it in to your skin. It smells aromatic because it uses vanilla as its base. As a result, our formula is the only formula on the market that allows us to customize scents based on an individuals needs and preferences. The formulation is comprised of food-based ingredients that are great for those who have sensitive skin and are worried about what they put on their body. It is safe to use on pets, kids, and adults. For those looking to enjoy the outdoors without smelling or feeling like they put on bug spray and eliminating toxins from their products and the environment, BYE-YOU BUG® is a great alternative. SPRAY MORE, SWAT LESS, SMELL GOOD!
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15 Jul Space: Mars Sample Return by BoldlyGo Institute

[caption id="attachment_42" align="alignleft" width="300"]SCIM will journey to Mars and perform a high-speed atmospheric pass collecting Martian dust particles. With its precious cargo onboard, SCIM will return the samples to Earth for detailed analysis in advanced technology laboratories. Source: BoldlyGo Institute In 2020, SCIM will embark on a two year journey to Mars to perform a high-speed atmospheric pass collecting tiny dust particles. SCIM will take another half year to return the samples to Earth for detailed analysis. Source: BoldlyGo Institute[/caption]

A nonprofit corporation called BoldlyGo Institute (BGI) is developing a Mars Sample Return mission called the Sample Collection to Investigate Mars (SCIM) which will return the first samples of Martian materials back to Earth. The project is at the preliminary design stage and the goal is ambitious. With a launch date of July 26, 2020, SCIM will journey through space for two years. When it reaches Mars, it will swoop down and collect the dust particles from the Martian atmosphere below 40 km. The SCIM has an aerodynamic aeroshell allowing it to rapidly pass through the atmosphere without being captured by Mars's gravity. The sample capture mechanism for the Mars Sample Return Mission is similar to the successful collection system for the Stardust mission which used aerogel to capture dust particles. After collecting thousands of particles, the spacecraft will leave Mars on August 3, 2022 and return directly to Earth by February 1, 2023 where the sterilized samples will descend by parachutes to the ground.

Sample return offers advantages over the current and past robotic missions to Mars where samples have been only analyzed on Mars. Earth-based lab instruments are much more sophisticated than what can be packed into a Mars rover or lander allowing much greater detailed analysis. Furthermore, there is no time limit for analysis; as more advanced instruments are developed, they can be applied on curated samples. Lastly and perhaps speaking most intriguingly of BoldlyGo Institute's philosophy, participation can involve hundreds of scientists and students--many of whom may not be traditionally involved in the Mars science community. Interested in more of my posts and other writings outside of Impact Hound? Follow me on Twitter: @shenge86
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